How is the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) getting back to basics? What are the EPA’s strategic priorities? How is the EPA changing the way it does business? Join us as we explore these questions and more.

Listen to the first segment of this interview.

What is the information technology strategy for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency? How is the EPA modernizing its technology infrastructure and ensuring its IT investments align with its overall mission? What is the EPA doing to balanced stewardship of information and technology? Join host Michael Keegan as he explores these questions and more with Ann Dunkin, Chief Information Officer at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Listen to her interview.

Paul Anastas, Ph.D. is the Assistant Administrator for EPA’s Office of Research and Development (ORD) and the Science Advisor to the Agency. Known widely as the “Father of Green Chemistry” for his groundbreaking research on the design, manufacture, and use of minimally-toxic, environmentally-friendly chemicals, Dr. Anastas has an extensive record of leadership in government, academia, and the private sector.

At the time he was nominated by President Obama to lead ORD, Dr. Anastas was the Director of the Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering, and the inaugural Teresa and H. John Heinz III Professor in the Practice of Chemistry for the Environment at Yale University’s School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Prior to joining the Yale faculty, Dr. Anastas was the founding Director of the Green Chemistry Institute, headquartered at the American Chemical Society in Washington, D.C. From 1999 to 2004 he worked at the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, concluding his service there as the assistant director for the environment. Dr. Anastas began his career as a staff chemist at EPA, where he rose to the positions of chief of the Industrial Chemistry Branch, and director of the U.S. Green Chemistry Program. It was during his work at EPA that Dr. Anastas coined the term “green chemistry.”

Trained as a synthetic organic chemist, Dr. Anastas’ research interests have focused on the design of safer chemicals, bio-based polymers, and new methodologies of chemical synthesis that are more efficient and less hazardous to the environment. A leading writer on the subjects of sustainability, green chemistry, and green engineering, he has published ten books, including “Benign by Design,” Designing Safer Polymers,” “Green Engineering” and his seminal work with co-author John Warner, “Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice.”

Dr. Anastas has been recognized for his pioneering work with a host of awards and accolades including the Vice President’s Hammer Award, the Joseph Seifter Award for Scientific Excellence, the Nolan Sommer Award for Distinguished Contributions to Chemistry, the Greek Chemical Society Award for Contributions to Chemistry, the Inaugural Canadian Green Chemistry Award, a Scientific American 50 Award for Policy Innovation, the John Jeyes Award from the Royal Society of Chemistry, and an Annual Leadership in Science Award from the Council of Scientific Society Presidents. He was a Special Professor at the University of Nottingham and an Honorary Professor at Queens University in Belfast where he was also was awarded an Honorary Doctorate.

Dr. Anastas earned his B.S. from the University of Massachusetts at Boston and his M.A. and Ph.D. in chemistry from Brandeis University.

Listen to the complete interview.

In this issue of The Business of Government magazine, we survey the intersection where leadership, complex challenges, and the need for transformation meet. Whether it’s in the response to the global financial crisis, the national deficit, or the myriad of other pressing issues facing us, uncertainty seems boundless while constraints on resources are very real. It is within this context that we’ve assembled a varied group of government executives and thought leaders who are focusing on these problems and working to mitigate their effects. They offer their insights, lessons learned, and recommendations on these topics. It’s about connecting research to practice—crafting smart approaches that tame immediate demands without losing sight of the iterative nature of problem solving. This goes to the core of the Center’s mission: linking theory to practice as a way of shaping the business of government.

Listen to the entire program.