Join host Michael Keegan as he welcomes outgoing two-term Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel to reflect on his public service career and his pursuit of innovative initiatives around financial transparency, leveraging technological advances such as cryptocurrency and blockchain, and enhancing how his office does business.

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Why does U.S. Department of Defense lack of an auditable financial statement? What has DoD done to get to auditability? What challenges are faced in getting audited financial statement and how can DoD do better? Join host Michael Keegan as he explores these questions and more with Peter K. Levine of the Institute for Defense Analyses.

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impact government agencies and other sectors? What is the affect on the efficiency and effectiveness of government? Are we facing a fiscal cliff or slope? We will explore these questions and much more with Professor Phil Joyce, author of the new IBM Center report, The Costs of Budget Uncertainty: Analyzing the Impact of Late Appropriations.

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Philip Joyce is Professor of Management, Finance and Leadership in the Maryland School of Public Policy. Professor Joyce’s teaching and research interests include public budgeting, performance measurement, and intergovernmental relations. He is the author of The Congressional Budget Office: Honest Numbers, Power, and Policymaking (Georgetown University Press, 2011), and coauthor of two books—Government Performance: Why Management Matters (Johns Hopkins, 2003) and Public Budgeting Systems, 9th Edition (Jones and Bartlett, 2013) . He is the author of more than 50 other publications (including book chapters and articles), appearing in journals such as the Public Administration Review, Public Budgeting & Finance, The Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Administration and Society, and the Handbook of Government Budgeting. His 1993 article, “Using Performance Measures for Federal Budgeting: Proposals and Prospects” was reprinted in Classics of Public Administration (1997).

Professor Joyce is Editor of Public Budgeting & Finance, is a Past President of the American Association of Budget and Program Analysis and is a Past Chair of the American Society for Public Administration (ASPA)’s Center on Accountability and Performance (CAP). Professor Joyce is the recipient of a number of grants since 2000 from The Pew Charitable Trusts, focusing on the performance of state governments and federal agencies. The highest profile grant funded his participation in the Government Performance Project, which evaluated the performance of state governments, including their management of money, people, infrastructure, and information. He also was the Principal Investigator on the Pew-funded Federal Performance Project, which undertook a similar evaluation of federal agencies between 2000 and 2002.

In addition to his work at the University of Maryland, Dr. Joyce has been on the faculty of The George Washington University, the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University, and the University of Kentucky. He also has 12 years of public sector work experience, including four years with the Illinois Bureau of the Budget and five years with the United States Congressional Budget Office (CBO). In 1992, he received the CBO Director’s Award for Distinguished Service. He received his PhD. from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University, his MPA from Penn State University, and his bachelor’s degree from Thiel College, Greenville, PA.

Dr. Joyce is a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. He is the recipient of several national awards, including the Aaron Wildavsky Award for lifetime scholarship in public budgeting and finance, the Elmer Staats Award from the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration, and the Joseph Wholey Award from the American Society for Public Administration. He has done extensive volunteer work in his local community of Arlington, Virginia, including recently serving as Chair of the Budget Advisory Council to the Arlington County School Board. He has consulted and lectured internationally, both as an individual and for the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. This consulting work has taken him to Bulgaria, China, Guyana, Korea, Latvia, Lithuania, Mexico, and Slovenia.

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Rafael Borras oversees management of the Department of Homeland Security’s $56 billion budget, appropriations, expenditure of funds, and accounting, and finance. He administers control over the Department’s $17 billion in acquisitions and procurement. He is responsible for directing human capital resources and personnel programs for the Department’s 230,000 employees. Mr. Borras administers control of the Department’s information technology enterprise architecture. Mr. Borras is responsible for oversight of the Department’s facilities, property, equipment, and other material resources. He administers programs and processes that provide security for personnel, information technology and communications systems, facilities, property, equipment, and other material resources.

Mr. Borras has 27 years of management experience in the federal government, city government, and the non-profit and private sector. He has deep experience in the areas within the portfolio of the Under Secretary for Management at the Department of Homeland Security, including finance, human capital, facilities, information technology, and procurement.

Prior to his appointment with the Department, Mr. Borras served as a Vice President with URS Corporation, a global engineering services firm. As Vice President of the Infrastructure and Environment Division, Mr. Borras managed Program Management and Construction Management profit and loss; overseeing operation business development and staffing as well as the National Federal Management and Construction Management Initiative.

Prior to joining URS, Mr. Borras served as the Regional Administrator for the Mid-Atlantic Region of the U.S. General Services Administration. As regional administrator, he managed an organization with more than 1,300 employees, providing federal customer agencies with real estate services; supply and procurement, vehicle acquisition, and leasing services; and information technology telecommunications services.

Mr. Borras served as Deputy Assistant Secretary for Administration in the U.S. Department of Commerce where he was responsible for overseeing the Department’s financial, personnel, information technology, budget, administrative services, acquisition, grants, and Equal Employment Opportunity functions. He also served as Deputy City Manager in the City of Hartford, Connecticut, where he was responsible for the departments of finance, police, fire, code enforcement, information technology, purchasing, budget, and human relations.

Mr. Borras began his public sector career as Administrative Officer for the Office of the County Manager in 1982 with Metropolitan Dade County Government in Dade County, Fla.

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