Is the emerging vision of government as a platform too farfetched and unrealistic? Or does it portend a new era of citizen engagement in public service innovation? What are the distinct roles for citizens in public service co-creation and problem-solving? Are there strategies for creating an environment for co-creation? Join host Michael Keegan as he explores these questions with the Satish Nambisan, co-author of “Engaging Citizens in Co-Creation in Public Services.”

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W. Henry Lambright is Professor of Public Administration, International Affairs, and Political Science and Director of the Science and Technology Policy Program at the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University. He teaches courses at the Maxwell School on technology and politics; energy, environment, and resources policy; and bureaucracy and politics.

Dr. Lambright has served as a guest scholar at The Brookings Institution; the director of the Science and Technology Policy Center at the Syracuse Research Corporation; and director of the Center for Environmental Policy and Administration at the Maxwell School at Syracuse University. He has served as an adjunct professor in the Graduate Program of Environmental Science in the College of Environmental Science and Forestry at the State University of New York. He has testified before Congress and been interviewed by the media on many topics, including the environment, science and technology, and government management.

A long-standing student of large-scale technical projects, he has worked for NASA as a special assistant in its Office of University Affairs and has been a member of its History Advisory Committee. Dr. Lambright has performed research for organizations including the National Science Foundation, NASA, the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and the State Department. He edited the book, NASA in the 21st Century, published by the Johns Hopkins University Press in 2003. He is also the author of four previously published IBM Center reports: Transforming Government: Dan Goldin and the Remaking of NASA (2001); Managing ‘Big Science’: A Case Study of the Human Genome Project (2002); The Challenge of Coordinating ‘Big Science’ (2003); Executive Response to Changing Fortune: Sean O’Keefe as NASA Administrator (2005); and Launching a New Mission: Michael Griffin and NASA’s Return to the Moon (2009).

Dr. Lambright is the author or editor of six additional books, including Powering Apollo: James E. Webb of NASA; Technology and U.S. Competitiveness: An Institutional Focus; and Presidential Management of Science and Technology: The Johnson Presidency. In addition, he has written approximately 300 articles, papers, and reports.

His doctorate is from Columbia University, where he also received a master’s degree. Dr. Lambright received his undergraduate degree from Johns Hopkins University.

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impact government agencies and other sectors? What is the affect on the efficiency and effectiveness of government? Are we facing a fiscal cliff or slope? We will explore these questions and much more with Professor Phil Joyce, author of the new IBM Center report, The Costs of Budget Uncertainty: Analyzing the Impact of Late Appropriations.

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Philip Joyce is Professor of Management, Finance and Leadership in the Maryland School of Public Policy. Professor Joyce’s teaching and research interests include public budgeting, performance measurement, and intergovernmental relations. He is the author of The Congressional Budget Office: Honest Numbers, Power, and Policymaking (Georgetown University Press, 2011), and coauthor of two books—Government Performance: Why Management Matters (Johns Hopkins, 2003) and Public Budgeting Systems, 9th Edition (Jones and Bartlett, 2013) . He is the author of more than 50 other publications (including book chapters and articles), appearing in journals such as the Public Administration Review, Public Budgeting & Finance, The Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, Administration and Society, and the Handbook of Government Budgeting. His 1993 article, “Using Performance Measures for Federal Budgeting: Proposals and Prospects” was reprinted in Classics of Public Administration (1997).

Professor Joyce is Editor of Public Budgeting & Finance, is a Past President of the American Association of Budget and Program Analysis and is a Past Chair of the American Society for Public Administration (ASPA)’s Center on Accountability and Performance (CAP). Professor Joyce is the recipient of a number of grants since 2000 from The Pew Charitable Trusts, focusing on the performance of state governments and federal agencies. The highest profile grant funded his participation in the Government Performance Project, which evaluated the performance of state governments, including their management of money, people, infrastructure, and information. He also was the Principal Investigator on the Pew-funded Federal Performance Project, which undertook a similar evaluation of federal agencies between 2000 and 2002.

In addition to his work at the University of Maryland, Dr. Joyce has been on the faculty of The George Washington University, the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University, and the University of Kentucky. He also has 12 years of public sector work experience, including four years with the Illinois Bureau of the Budget and five years with the United States Congressional Budget Office (CBO). In 1992, he received the CBO Director’s Award for Distinguished Service. He received his PhD. from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University, his MPA from Penn State University, and his bachelor’s degree from Thiel College, Greenville, PA.

Dr. Joyce is a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. He is the recipient of several national awards, including the Aaron Wildavsky Award for lifetime scholarship in public budgeting and finance, the Elmer Staats Award from the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration, and the Joseph Wholey Award from the American Society for Public Administration. He has done extensive volunteer work in his local community of Arlington, Virginia, including recently serving as Chair of the Budget Advisory Council to the Arlington County School Board. He has consulted and lectured internationally, both as an individual and for the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. This consulting work has taken him to Bulgaria, China, Guyana, Korea, Latvia, Lithuania, Mexico, and Slovenia.

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Jane E. Fountain is Professor of Political Science and Public Policy and Adjunct Professor of Computer Science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Previously, she served for 16 years on the faculty of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. She is the founder and Director of the National Center for Digital Government and the Science, Technology and Society Initiative, based at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Professor Fountain has been the Chair and Vice Chair and is currently a member of the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on the Future of Government. She serves on the Massachusetts Governor’s Council on Innovation, served on the American Bar Association blue ribbon Commission on the Future of e-Rulemaking and has been a member of several advisory bodies for organizations including the Social Science Research Council, the Internet Policy Institute, and the National Science Foundation. She has given keynote addresses and worked with intergovernmental institutions including the World Bank and the European Commission, and research and policy organizations in Japan, Portugal, Spain, the Netherlands, Nicaragua, Chile, Estonia, the UK, France, Hungary, Slovenia, New Zealand, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates.

Fountain is the author or co-editor of works including The Future of Government: Lessons Learned from around the World (co-authored with the Global Agenda Council on the Future of Government, World Economic Forum, 2011), which has been translated into Arabic and Russian; Building the Virtual State: Information Technology and Institutional Change (Brookings Institution Press, 2001), which was awarded an Outstanding Academic Title by Choice and has been translated into Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese, and Spanish; Digital Government: Advancing a Social Science Research Agenda (NCDG, 2002); and Proposition 2 ½: Its Impact on Massachusetts (co-edited with L. E. Susskind, OGH, 1983). Her articles have been published in scholarly journals including Governance, Technology in Society, Science and Public Policy, the National Civic Review, and the Communications of the Association for Computing Machinery.

Fountain has a Ph.D. from Yale University, in Organizational Behavior and in Political Science, and graduate degrees from Harvard and Yale Universities. She has been a Yale Fellow, a Mellon Fellow, and Fellow of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. She is an inaugural Fellow of the Information Technology and Politics section of the APSA and a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration.

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Jane E. Fountain is Professor of Political Science and Public Policy and Adjunct Professor of Computer Science at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Previously, she served for 16 years on the faculty of the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. She is the founder and Director of the National Center for Digital Government and the Science, Technology and Society Initiative, based at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Professor Fountain has been the Chair and Vice Chair and is currently a member of the World Economic Forum Global Agenda Council on the Future of Government. She serves on the Massachusetts Governor’s Council on Innovation, served on the American Bar Association blue ribbon Commission on the Future of e-Rulemaking and has been a member of several advisory bodies for organizations including the Social Science Research Council, the Internet Policy Institute, and the National Science Foundation. She has given keynote addresses and worked with intergovernmental institutions including the World Bank and the European Commission, and research and policy organizations in Japan, Portugal, Spain, the Netherlands, Nicaragua, Chile, Estonia, the UK, France, Hungary, Slovenia, New Zealand, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates.

Fountain is the author or co-editor of works including The Future of Government: Lessons Learned from around the World (co-authored with the Global Agenda Council on the Future of Government, World Economic Forum, 2011), which has been translated into Arabic and Russian; Building the Virtual State: Information Technology and Institutional Change (Brookings Institution Press, 2001), which was awarded an Outstanding Academic Title by Choice and has been translated into Chinese, Japanese, Portuguese, and Spanish; Digital Government: Advancing a Social Science Research Agenda (NCDG, 2002); and Proposition 2 ½: Its Impact on Massachusetts (co-edited with L. E. Susskind, OGH, 1983). Her articles have been published in scholarly journals including Governance, Technology in Society, Science and Public Policy, the National Civic Review, and the Communications of the Association for Computing Machinery.

Fountain has a Ph.D. from Yale University, in Organizational Behavior and in Political Science, and graduate degrees from Harvard and Yale Universities. She has been a Yale Fellow, a Mellon Fellow, and Fellow of the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study. She is an inaugural Fellow of the Information Technology and Politics section of the APSA and a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration.

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Professor Davenport is the President’s Chair in Information Technology and Management at Babson College.

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